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‘Logan Lucky’ review: Steven Soderbergh’s hillbilly heist comedy is endlessly pleasurable

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Steven Soderbergh is quite possibly the smartest person in the film industry. Ever since Sex, Lies, and Videotape blew up the Sundance Film Festival 28 years ago, the director has been undermining and indulging and exploring the multiplex with rigorous, original, high-quality adult cinema (while still maintaining that charmingly juvenile radical streak). Though his last theatrical release may have technically been half a decade ago with the shoddy 70s imitation game of Magic Mike, his true previous work of cinema, The Knick, was a masterpiece of shapeshifting, body horror, materialism, medical historiography, and cultural anthropology. Logan Lucky, in contrast, is a much simpler, streamlined, a heist film that dances with the goofy dissonance of white America. That it’s still quite good is as much a relief as it is more or less the status quo now. Each new Soderbergh offers an updated annexation of capitalism and American art, and if Logan Lucky isn’t his most incisive, it’s certainly one of the more fun. 

Logan Lucky still tends towards some of that 70s cinema aping, with its egregiously heated color palate and altruistic masculinity, and the goof on morality in crime rings trite and dull. But mostly, the film is just a total joy. These people, sandwiched on the border between West Virginia (whose governor recently flopped back over to the Republican party) and North Carolina (which is, as last year’s Little Sister proved, our nation’s most politically weird state). The film is structured so tightly, but Soderbergh’s shots breathe, each environment given proper weight and spatial awareness.

Logan Lucky is a film so pristinely assembled, finely tuned to the way of America, rich and satisfying and so warmly funny. The film skips and glides, so naturally, towards its conclusion without the fatalism of overwriting. Logan lucky carries the inimitable, unassuming aura of a Soderbergh production from the very first frame. The intelligence carries through every moment. Every gesture is inspired, so fully-developed and in-line. Much could be said on the peculiar disheartening transition from maverick experimental filmmaker to populist workman, but there’s a gentle air here that dissuades the audience from any cynical reading. Soderbergh’s talent lies in bringing that inventive energy to even the simplest of scenarios.

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Channing Tatum holds the film aloft so instrumentally and with grace and technical maturity, expanding the common gauge for someone already established as one of the great actors of his generations (that’s common consensus, right?). Adam Driver is a miracle worker of underperforming. His deadpan buffoonery, love for his brother, obsession with a family curse, all of it is neither deadened nor overzealous; It is odd and human and real. Daniel Craig’s Joe Bang looks tired. This is a compliment. His zany energy in the marketing for the film threatened overperforming. Thankfully, Joe Bang is an odd duck, contemplative, amusingly neurotic bottle rocket. It’s not just that Daniel Craig is smiling onscreen for the first time in a decade; it’s the first time in ages his disaffection felt so welcome. Minor players like the magnificent Riley Keough, Hilary Swank, Sebastian Stan, and, hell, even Seth MacFarlane, are all so wonderfully employed throughout.

The last fifteen minutes are so inexplicably perfect. The screenplay (allegedly and hilariously ghostwritten by Julie Asner under the pseudonym Rebecca Blunt), moves beyond the heist, beyond even an Ocean’s Eleven style epilogue con, to a communion of progress under capitalism. Though the film plays bipartisan as hell, Soderbergh captures the raucous ennui of the middle-class white south. It luxuriates in the ease and wit of the heist but refuses to give into the lens of a class based conflict. This is a film that gives voice to those who feel underrepresented without disavowing their privilege. It’s frustrating to see a film so nearly approach such vital satire, especially considering the ripe contemporary setting, but that cognisance allows its humanism to flower even further; the goodness of these people is real, if not that of the world they inhabit.

It’s hard to overpraise the film, though it is small and minor. Soderbergh is a great director with a startlingly short supply of truly great films. Rather, he prefers to produce weird, wonderfully personal works of exploration, refinement, indulgence, and moderation. He explores the American working class with humanism that it’s easy to forget that at the core of all his work, he’s pretty much just fucking around. Like Jack London, the movie is as damning of the limits of poverty and Americana as it is infatuated with the charms that restrict the nation. If the film falls short of greatness, (a fact of which I am still unsure), it is due only to its lightness, its ability to spring effortlessly from moment to moment, prioritized to the point where scenes occasionally lose density, sliding through plot or wicked gaffs. Regardless, such is a small price to pay for such a wonderful movie. Logan Lucky is a damn magical object, pure, and endlessly pleasurable.

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‘Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool’ review: Annette Bening shines in this flawed Gloria Grahame biopic

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Annette Bening and Jamie Bell

Annette Bening is captivating in the role of former Hollywood starlet Gloria Grahame in Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool, which follows the Oscar-winning actress in her later years as she develops a relationship with Peter Turner (Jamie Bell), an aspiring actor from England who falls head over heels for the fading star the moment he lays his eyes on her in the North London guesthouse where they are both lodging.

Based on the memoir of the same name by Turner, Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool, which first premiered at the Telluride Film Festival last year, is as stunning as it is romantic, though, beyond the wonderful performances by Bening and Bell, whose chemistry sparks the moment they begin to interact with each other, there isn’t much here that we haven’t seen before—the film just feels too basic and too generic.

Perhaps its Matt Greenhalgh’s script or Paul McGuigan’s direction, but there’s something about Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool that causes the first hour or so of the film to feel unbearably boring, making it difficult to feel invested or even care about its rather predictable story that ends with inevitable tragedy. It feels as if the actors are doing most of the work in this film, and they do the best they can with what they have available.

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That being said, the film is still magnificent from a visual standpoint. Ula Pontikos’ magical cinematography, which utilizes lighting and color so effectively, is wonderful to soak in, while editor Nick Emerson flawlessly takes us back and forth between flashbacks and the present with such efficiency. And, oddly enough, despite the unauthentic look of the rear-projection used to transport Bening and Bell to cities such as New York City and Malibu, it makes Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool feel like one of the old Hollywood movies the real Grahame would’ve starred in back in the day.

By the time the film is over and the end title track, “You Shouldn’t Look At Me That Way,” written and performed by the great Elvis Costello, begins to play, you’ll probably wish that Film Stars Don’t Die in Liverpool had more to offer than just powerhouse performances and nice filmmaking techniques rather than a typical, by-the-books premise; especially one about someone as interesting and eccentric as Grahame.

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‘Call Me by Your Name’ review: Luca Guadagnino’s intoxicating gay love story is one for the ages

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Call Me by Your Name

From the moment the opening credits appear in Luca Guadagnino’s intoxicating new film Call Me by Your Name (scored to the sweet, melodious sounds of “Hallelujah Junction – 1st Movement” by John Adams), you know you’re in for a very special treat; a treat that will leave you thinking about the film you’ve just watched for hours upon end, like it did for me. It’s lush, erotic, riveting and, above all, simply delightful.

Based on the acclaimed first novel by André Aciman, and adapted for the screen by James Ivory (who cameos in the film, alongside producer Peter Spears), Call Me by Your Name transports its viewer to a sun-soaked Northern Italy in 1983 and follows Elio Perlman (Timothée Chalamet), an awkward, horny, not-so-average 17-year-old who enjoys transcribing music, reading books, swimming at the local river, and going out at night, as he describes to Oliver (Armie Hammer) in one scene. The latter is a chiseled, charming 24-year-old American graduate student staying at Elio’s parent’s (Michael Stuhlbarg, Amira Casar) gorgeous 17th-century villa as the annual summer intern tasked with helping Mr. Perlman, a professor specializing in Greco-Roman culture.

Elio appears dumbstruck by Oliver’s charisma early on in the film, invoking feelings of fascination, or perhaps even obsession, drawing him closer to the tall, sophisticated blond man that just seemingly waltzed into his own tiny little lazy world, surrounded by the walls of his parent’s villa. However, soon enough, we realize Elio isn’t the only one plagued with these feelings—Oliver feels just the same—and they share an amorous kiss on the side of a dirt road, surrounded by towering green grass and no one but themselves.

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“No, no, no. I know myself,” Oliver says after pushing Elio away when he comes in for a second kiss. “We’ve been good. We haven’t done anything to be ashamed of and that’s a good thing. I want to be good, OK?” Though, Elio doesn’t take this too seriously, as he places his hand on Oliver’s crotch, grabs it a few times, and asks him, “Am I offending you?” It’s a cutesy, playful moment, and is really just the beginning Guadagnino’s masterful tale of first love.

Oh, how wonderful it is to watch Sayombhu Mukdeeprom’s (who also shot Guadagnino’s upcoming Suspiria remake) stunning 35mm cinematography as he captures a summer that will change the lives of Elio and Oliver forever; riding bike rides around the town square, indulging in luscious breakfasts under the sun, engaging in secret meetings on the villa’s balcony, smoking cigarettes while discussing European history, and, yes, for those of you who’ve read the book, making love to peaches. It’s a relaxing, peaceful, spellbinding film with no real antagonist other than time and Oliver’s impending departure.

Chalamet, a young, new, fresh face in the world of Hollywood, who also appears in this year’s Lady Bird and Hostiles, delivers what is undoubtedly the best performance of the year in Call Me by Your Name as Elio, while Hammer, perhaps best known for his work in The Social Network and The Man from U.N.C.L.E., proves just how much range he truly has an actor in the role of Oliver; the two are an impressive dynamic duo, and it’s hard to even imagine anyone else playing as their characters. And, just when you’ve thought Stuhlbarg’s wise Mr. Perlman has stolen the show with a riveting, heartfelt speech to his son during the final act of the film, Chalamet swoops in with a silent, delicate close-up under the end-credits that will, undeniably, give you chills, if not tears.

Call Me by Your Name is a modern gay love story for the ages.

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‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ review: Rian Johnson delivers a riveting intergalactic spectacle

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The Last Jedi Mark Hamill

Star Wars: The Last Jedi begins just like any other installment in George Lucas’ long-running intergalactic franchise: A static blue text that reads “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away,” followed by that rousing, iconic theme song composed by John Williams and a brief, yet informative opening crawl, teasing the adventures to come over the course of the next 150 minutes (making it the longest Star Wars movie to date).

But look a little closer and you’ll see that The Last Jedi is as unique and special as the diverse cast of characters it showcases, and writer-director Rian Johnson looks to take this series to a whole new level with the latest chapter in the seemingly never-ending Skywalker-saga that finds not one, but two central characters grappling with the Light and Dark sides of the Force.

As we see in that unforgettable The Force Awakens finale (the best part of a rather lackluster film), Rey (Daisy Ridley) has traveled to the gorgeous, Porg-infested island of Ahch-To to deliver Luke Skywalker’s (Mark Hamill) long-lost blue-bladed lightsaber and to convince him to join the Resistance in order to help defeat the First Order. However, a weary, worn-out-looking Luke doesn’t seem to have much interest in doing so, telling Rey that “it’s time for the Jedi to end” once and for all.

Meanwhile, the First Order, led by General Hux (Domhnall Gleeson), hot on the tail of the Resistance, is ready to strike again in retaliation for the destruction of its Starkiller Base. With General Leia Organa (Carrie Fisher) and Vice Admiral Holdo (Laura Dern) calling the shots, the Rebel army must act quick, as both time and fuel are running out fast. However, Poe Dameron (Oscar Isaac), takes matters into his own hands and enlists the help of Finn (John Boyega) and Rose (Kelly Marie Tran) to help carry out his rather dangerous plan of infiltrating the First Order’s fleet and disabling their tracking system.

Though the pacing could certainly be a bit tighter at times, Johnson does a more than impressive job of balancing multiple storylines in The Last Jedi (three, to be exact), and they all eventually come full circle by the time the credits start to roll and the age-old mysteries of the Force and shocking revelations of the past have finally been unlocked. Chances are, though, fans will be too lost in this riveting, visual feast of a film to even notice (or care about) something such as minor pacing issues or out of place humor.

Much like he did in The Force Awakens, the scar-faced Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) practically steals the show and reveals a much different side to his character than we’ve previously seen. “Forget the Jedi! Forget the Sith! Forget the First Order!” he exclaims at one point in the film, revealing his desire to start an entirely new order. But it’s whether or not he can convince Rey to join him that will keep audiences on the edge of their seat for the duration of the film.

A dazzling, gorgeously put-together sci-fi action extravaganza, The Last Jedi was obviously handled with much love and care by Johnson in both his writing and direction and that certainly translates on screen. The multiple storylines are exciting, while the characters, both the newcomers and the veterans, are simply wonderful to watch develop over the course of the film.

It’s no wonder why Walt Disney and Lucasfilm decided to give Johnson an entirely new Star Wars trilogy to create; the franchise is in exceptionally good hands as indicated by The Last Jedi.

AROUND THE WEB

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