Read Oprah Winfrey's moving Golden Globes acceptance speech in full
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Read the full transcript of Oprah Winfrey’s moving Cecil B. DeMille Award acceptance speech

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Oprah Winfrey
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At the 75th Golden Globes on Sunday, Oprah Winfrey became the first black woman to receive the Cecil B. DeMille Award from The Hollywood Foreign Press Association. However, it wasn’t the award people were talking about last night; it was Oprah’s magnificently inspiring speech that reminded girls around the world that a new day is indeed on the horizon, and that the Time’s Up movement is in full force. You can read a full transcript of Oprah’s acceptance speech below.

“Thank you, Reese. In 1964, I was a little girl sitting on the linoleum floor of my mother’s house in Milwaukee watching Anne Bancroft present the Oscar for best actor at the 36th Academy Awards. She opened the envelope and said five words that literally made history:” The winner is Sidney Poitier.” Up to the stage came the most elegant man I ever remembered. His tie was white, his skin was black—and he was being celebrated. I’d never seen a black man being celebrated like that. I tried many, many times to explain what a moment like that means to a little girl, a kid watching from the cheap seats as my mom came through the door bone tired from cleaning other people’s houses. But all I can do is quote and say that the explanation in Sidney’s performance in Lilies of the Field: “Amen, amen, amen, amen.” 

In 1982, Sidney received the Cecil B. DeMille award right here at the Golden Globes and it is not lost on me that at this moment, there are some little girls watching as I become the first black woman to be given this same award. It is an honor—it is an honor and it is a privilege to share the evening with all of them and also with the incredible men and women who have inspired me, who challenged me, who sustained me and made my journey to this stage possible. Dennis Swanson who took a chance on me for A.M. Chicago. Saw me on the show and said to Steven Spielberg, she’s Sophia in ‘The Color Purple.’ Gayle who’s been a friend and Stedman who’s been my rock. 

I want to thank the Hollywood Foreign Press Association. We know the press is under siege these days. We also know it’s the insatiable dedication to uncovering the absolute truth that keeps us from turning a blind eye to corruption and to injustice. To—to tyrants and victims, and secrets and lies. I want to say that I value the press more than ever before as we try to navigate these complicated times, which brings me to this: what I know for sure is that speaking your truth is the most powerful tool we all have. And I’m especially proud and inspired by all the women who have felt strong enough and empowered enough to speak up and share their personal stories. Each of us in this room are celebrated because of the stories that we tell, and this year we became the story. 

But it’s not just a story affecting the entertainment industry. It’s one that transcends any culture, geography, race, religion, politics, or workplace. So I want tonight to express gratitude to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault because they, like my mother, had children to feed and bills to pay and dreams to pursue. They’re the women whose names we’ll never know. They are domestic workers and farm workers. They are working in factories and they work in restaurants and they’re in academia, engineering, medicine, and science. They’re part of the world of tech and politics and business. They’re our athletes in the Olympics and they’re our soldiers in the military. 

And there’s someone else, Recy Taylor, a name I know and I think you should know, too. In 1944, Recy Taylor was a young wife and mother walking home from a church service she’d attended in Abbeville, Alabama, when she was abducted by six armed white men, raped, and left blindfolded by the side of the road coming home from church. They threatened to kill her if she ever told anyone, but her story was reported to the NAACP where a young worker by the name of Rosa Parks became the lead investigator on her case and together they sought justice. But justice wasn’t an option in the era of Jim Crow. The men who tried to destroy her were never persecuted. Recy Taylor died ten days ago, just shy of her 98th birthday. She lived as we all have lived, too many years in a culture broken by brutally powerful men. For too long, women have not been heard or believed if they dare speak the truth to the power of those men. But their time is up. Their time is up.

Their time is up. And I just hope—I just hope that Recy Taylor died knowing that her truth, like the truth of so many other women who were tormented in those years, and even now tormented, goes marching on. It was somewhere in Rosa Parks’ heart almost 11 years later, when she made the decision to stay seated on that bus in Montgomery, and it’s here with every woman who chooses to say, “Me too.” And every man—every man who chooses to listen. 

In my career, what I’ve always tried my best to do, whether on television or through film, is to say something about how men and women really behave. To say how we experience shame, how we love and how we rage, how we fail, how we retreat, persevere, and how we overcome. I’ve interviewed and portrayed people who’ve withstood some of the ugliest things life can throw at you, but the one quality all of them seem to share is an ability to maintain hope for a brighter morning, even during our darkest nights. So I want all the girls watching here, now, to know that a new day is on the horizon! And when that new day finally dawns, it will be because of a lot of magnificent women, many of whom are right here in this room tonight, and some pretty phenomenal men, fighting hard to make sure that they become the leaders who take us to the time when nobody ever has to say ‘Me too’ again.”

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The ‘Uncharted’ movie is probably just one of those things that’s never actually going to get made

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Uncharted
NAUGHTY DOG/SONY INTERACTIVE

Between Spider-Man parting ways with the Marvel Cinematic Universe and now this new development regarding the long-in-the-works film adaptation of Uncharted, it’s been a pretty eventful and rather unfortunate week for Tom Holland.

Dan Trachtenberg, the fifth director to be attached to Uncharted, has reportedly exited the project for unspecified reasons, though it’s likely it had to do with creative differences or whatever bullshit excuse it is that these studios manage to pull out of their asses whenever a director leaves a high-profile project.

Again, Trachtenberg was not the first, second, third, or fourth director to be attached to be Uncharted, but the FIFTH. David O. Russell, Neil Burger, Seth Gordon, and Shawn Levy were all attached to the project at one point or another but ended up leaving for various different reasons.

On the bright side (?), however, Sony is already looking to lock down a replacement for Trachtenberg and a new director should be in place soon in anticipation of the film’s early 2020 production start.

But, like, let’s be real here for a second; what are the chances of the Uncharted movie actually happening at this point? This is a truly cursed production and if it does actually ever get made, I vow to release my tax returns.

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Adam Driver and Annette Bening work to expose the CIA’s torture program in ‘The Report’ trailer

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The Report
AMAZON STUDIOS

Another day, another trailer for a movie starring Adam Driver; a few days after Netflix blessed us with two teasers trailers for Noah Baumbach’s Marriage Story, Amazon Studios has released the first trailer Scott Z. Burns’ The Report.

Driver stars here as idealistic staffer Daniel J. Jones, who is tasked by his boss Senator Dianne Feinstein (Annette Bening) to lead an investigation of the CIA’s inhumane Detention and Interrogation Program, which was formed in the wake of 9/11 and used “enhanced interrogation techniques” — that’s government codeword for torture.

“Jones’ relentless pursuit of the truth leads to explosive findings that uncover the lengths to which the nation’s top intelligence agency went to destroy evidence, subvert the law, and hide a brutal secret from the American public,” reads the synopsis.

In addition to Driver and Bening, The Report features one hell of an impressive ensemble cast that includes the likes of Jon Hamm, Sarah Goldberg, Michael C. Hall, Douglas Hodge, Fajer Kaisi, Ted Levine, Jennifer Morrison, Tim Blake Nelson, Linda Powell, Matthew Rhys, T. Ryder Smith, Corey Stoll, and Maura Tierney.

The film premiered at and was purchased out of the Sundance Film Festival in January and currently boasts a 94% approval rating on Rotten Tomatoes, so it sounds like we’re going to be in for quite a treat when The Report hits theaters on November 15 and Prime Video on November 29.

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Charlize Theron, Nicole Kidman & Margot Robbie glare intensely at each other in the ‘Bombshell’ trailer

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Bombshell
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Despite taking place entirely in a hot, stuffy elevator and featuring little to no dialogue, the first trailer for Jay Roach’s Fox News drama Bombshell about the downfall of Roger Ailes does a pretty damn good job of showcasing what is likely to be a serious contender this awards season.

Written by Charles Randolph, Bombshell chronicles the inevitable collapse of Ailes’ reign at Fox News, where he served as chairman and CEO up until his resignation in 2016 amid dozens of sexual harassment and abuse allegations from several female employees at the conservative media empire.

Among the many women who accused Ailes of misconduct were former Fox News hosts Megyn Kelly and Gretchen Carlson, who are played here by Charlize Theron and Nicole Kidman, respectively, while Margot Robbie plays as a fictional associate producer named Kayla Pospisil.

As if those three stars weren’t enough, the film’s ensemble cast also includes the likes of John Lithgow (who plays Ailes), Allison Janney, Kate McKinnon, Malcolm McDowell, Mark Duplass, Rob Delaney, and Stephen Root.

I don’t know about you, but I dig everything about this trailer (I could literally watch Nicole Kidman, Charlize Theron, and Margot Robbie glaring at each other in an elevator all day) and I’m actually pretty excited to see how Bombshell turns out when it drops in December.

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