After Roe v. Wade, plans for a Gulf of Mexico Health Clinic are in place

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Plans for a floating health clinic are in the works to help people get surgical abortions regardless of their home state’s abortion laws.

PRROWESS — Protecting Reproductive Rights of Women Endangered by State Statutes — is an organization that will offer reproductive health and social services, including contraception, STI screenings, and surgical abortion up to 14 weeks.

The Gulf of Mexico is considered federal waters. A doctor plans on opening PRROWESS as a floating clinic. This means that their procedures and programming will be free from state restrictions.

“This is all about bodily autonomy and choice, and so people have a right to be pregnant and also not to have a pregnancy,” Dr. Meg Autry, of the University of California–San Francisco, told CBS San Francisco.

Autry, who serves as vice chair of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynology and Reproductive Sciences, at UCSF, would like to offer the services either at a reduced or full price. 

According to the organization’s website,The clinic will serve patients who reside primarily in Texas, Louisiana and other Gulf Coast states. The clinic will be open for approximately three weeks per month. 

According to the organization facilities such as these have been used for years by military relief organizations and the military. Patients can also receive health care at a floating clinic.

Because of restrictions in Gulf state health care, many people find it difficult to travel out of the country to seek treatment. PRROWESS is a company that offers faster services to those who need them. 

“The vessel will be Coast Guard inspected and will have helicopter access for transport and emergencies,”The organization states. 

According to the organization, once a patient is pre-screened arrangements will be made to transport them the floating clinic. 

It is estimated that the vessel which will serve as the floating health center will cost at least $20million.  The charity is seeking donations that include a boat.

“People that care deeply about access to reproductive rights know that we have to be innovative and creative in order for patients to be able to continue to have access,”Autry spoke to the outlet. 

“We know internationally that when access is limited or abortion is illegal, patients die.”

Autry anticipates opening the floating clinic within a year, despite the challenges. 

“There’s operational, logistics, there’s the whole idea of maritime law and then there’s obviously security, there’s liability, I mean the challenges are countless,”Autry stated. 

The organization states that if the project fails, the money will be redirected to similar projects that promote abortion access.