Storm Gladys to batter Brits with 8 inches of snow just after Franklin and Eunice

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Heavy snow will blast parts of the UK already submerged by floods and ravaged by Storm Franklin and Storm Eunice, leaving us under eight inches of snow.

The new 70mph Storm Gladys also threatens to be named this weekend and is set to cause more hell.

A 1,200-mile-wide “polar rush” from Greenland will bring up to 8in of snow in the north and -7C on Thursday, forecasters warned with severe gales due on Sunday in the north-west.

Flood-hit Britain will shiver tomorrow (Thursday, February 24) with sleet in the south, snow flurries in the north and up to 8in of “thundersnow” in Scotland, where lightning is due.

The -7C lows are expected tomorrow night.



Motorists receive assistance in snowy conditions in Scotland last week
Motorists receive assistance in snowy conditions in Scotland last week

Met Office forecaster Marco Petagna said: “After a crazy week of three storms and ongoing flooding concerns, snow in places is forecast in colder air from the north.

“And a deep low pressure system late in the weekend is one to watch for the north-west.”

Ex-BBC and Met Office forecaster John Hammond, of weathertrending, said: “Storms can rear their heads at very short notice.”

But the Met Office hit out at Brits who complained they were caught short by the extreme weather conditions earlier this week.



Ex-BBC and Met Office forecaster John Hammond, of weathertrending, said: “Storms can rear their heads at very short notice”
Ex-BBC and Met Office forecaster John Hammond, of weathertrending, said: “Storms can rear their heads at very short notice”

Social media users moaned that red warnings were issued too late before Storm Eunice, which caused an estimated £300million of damage.

But the Met Office told the whingebags they had been forewarned for days.

One Twitter user said: “Met Office, too late on the red warning unfortunately.”

Bigballsbilly9 wrote: “The Met Office red warning for the South-East was obvious much earlier than when it was issued.”



People brave the elements as Storm Eunice causes large waves to crash against the seawall alongside Brighton Pier
People brave the elements as Storm Eunice causes large waves to crash against the seawall alongside Brighton Pier

Met Office forecaster Alex Deakin said: “We named it on Monday and gave people four days’ notice. The winds we were predicting came to fruition.”

Britain must prepare to battle more wet and wild weather in the years ahead, the Met Office warned.

It said: “More winter storms, including disproportionately more severe storms, are projected to cross the UK in the future.”

Forecasters say the triple whammy of Dudley, Eunice and Franklin, which battered the UK in the past week, were just a warm up and the Government needs to massively ramp up its emergency extreme weather plans if it wants to save lives, homes and businesses going forward.



Snowy conditions, near Tan Hill Inn, the England's highest pup at 1,732 feet (528m) above sea level, in North Yorkshire
Snowy conditions, near Tan Hill Inn, the England’s highest pup at 1,732 feet (528m) above sea level, in North Yorkshire

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Its ‘Future projections of UK storm activity’ document states: “The UK should expect to see storms more frequently than today, therefore additional adaptation and mitigation measures may be necessary to mitigate their impacts.”

Stormy weather in the UK is driven by the merciless North Atlantic Oscillation – a giant see-saw of atmospheric pressure.

Britain gets caught directly in the middle of a mighty tug of war between a high-pressure area over the Azores islands near Portugal and a low-pressure region over Iceland.

It means we get pummelled by two clashing weather fronts.